歴史

History

歴史

History

The history of Dai-ichi Takimotokan is the history of our town.

A history built on love.

Kinzo Takimoto was a carpenter in Edo (now Tokyo). At the age of 32 he moved to Oshamambe, Hokkaido, and later to Horobetsu where he worked on the construction of an ekiteijo, an accommodation facility for men and horses providing postal relay services. His wife Sata suffered from serious dermatosis. When Kinzo heard about the hot springs in Noboribetsu, he pushed his way up a mountain path with Sata, and built a tiny hut there so she could treat her condition. Sata began bathing in the waters and finally recovered. To promote the spa’s healing properties, Kinzo obtained permission to be a yumori (the keeper of a hot spring with exclusive rights) and opened an inn that offered hot spring bathing. Everything at Dai-ichi Takimotokan is rooted in this hot spring—one that was established for a cherished wife.

The inn became popular among Hokkaido’s indigenous Ainu, who had been the first to enjoy the spring’s waters, workmen at Mt. Io, and samurai stationed at the jinnya (administrative headquarters) of the Sendai domain in Shiraoi and the Nambu domain. Kinzo established an ekiteijo in Noboribetsu and succeeded in multiple ventures, including fishery management and agricultural development.

From the mid-Meiji period, Noboribetsu Onsen grew in popularity as a place for social gatherings. With the increasing number of spa guests, Kinzo improved the paths to the hot spring. He was decorated with the Medal with Blue Ribbon for his achievements in operating a horse-drawn carriage service.

Noboribetsu Onsen, which Kinzo established, has become one of the most popular onsen resorts in Japan, welcoming 2.8 million visitors a year. After many changes over the years, in 1953 Yumoto Takimoto changed its name to Dai-ichi Takimotokan, and is committed to fostering Kinzo’s spirit of hospitality.

Dai-ichi Takimotokan timeline

1858 – 1938

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1858  Kinzo Takimoto settled in Oshamanbe and later transferred to Horobetsu, then to Noboribetsu.
1881  Using his own funds, Kinzo opened a new road over Momijidani with the aim of developing a hot spring.
1888  A two-story building was erected, and officially named Yumoto Takimoto or Takimoto Hot Spring.
1890  The  building was expanded along with the first bathtub.
1898  Takimoto began offering hot water for paying customers, making it a sento or coin bath.
1899  Kinzo passed away at 72 years of age. Kinnosuke Takimoto, Kinzo’s eldest son and heir, succeeded to Kinzo’s name.
1900  The main building and inside bath were expanded, and the first sign saying Takimotokan erected.
1902  Kinnosuke Takimoto, 41 years old, passed away.
1903  Acquired Ishiyama Ryokan and Okamoto Ryokan and Dai-ni Takimotokan Building opened.
1903  The main building name was changed from Takimoto-kan to Dai-ichi Takimoto by Hama Takimoto.
1904  Sata Takimoto passed away.
1913  All property rights of the Takimoto family transferred to the Kuribayashi Company (Hot Spring Division).
1927  Gosaku Kuribayashi passed away at 62 years of age.
1927  Sotokichi Minami takes over Dai-ichi Takimoto.
1928  Construction to expand Dai-ichi Shinkan with three floors, 24 rooms, and a bath begins and is opened in April of that year.
1933  The baths including a radium spring were expanded and opened in January.
1938  Construction on large bath (largest in the Orient) at Dai-hachi Shinkan was completed in August.
1938  Izu Mitaka Onsen Takimoto opened.

1939 – 1978

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1939  Sotokichi Minami passed away at 75 years old. Seikichi Minami takes over.
1944  Seikichi Minami passed away at 53 years old. Kunio Minami takes over.
1946  Dai-ichi Takimotokan holds the first hot water festival.
1952  Takimotokan Company, Ltd. is established. The late Kinosuke’s wife, Hama, passed away at 84 years old.
1955  Izu Mitaka Onsen Takimoto closes.
1960  Prince Takamatsu stays in the western-style building.
1962  The first part of new bath expansion begins and opens in August.
1964  Niseko Takimoto opens. The Takimoto Annex opens.
1966  The New East building opens in May together with the second phase of the bath expansion.
1971  The New West Building opens in October. Niseko Takimoto closes.
1973  Kunio Minami passed away at 61 years old.
1973  Taro Minami takes over as director.
1977  The Takimoto Inn opens in April.

1979 – 2018

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1979  Takimoto Annex is closed.
1986  The new bath house is completed.
1989  The previous public bath is rebuilt as the main kitchen. The banquet room building Kasuikan opens.
1998  Buffet dining hall, Kiki-Saisai Attaka tei, opens.
1999  Dai-ichi Takimotokan website launched.
2003  Open-air baths for men and women expanded.

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